The World is Quiet Here

elizabitchtaylor:

If the point of the Big Bang Theory was to show that male nerds can be just as sexist as male jocks then well done I guess

insanitybreach:

CAN WE TALK ABOUT LEGION’S GAMER PROFILE

AND THE FACT THAT HE DONATED TO AN EDEN PRIME FUNDRAISER

AND THAT HE SPENT 75 HOURS ON A ROMANCE GAME

THIS ALONE MAKES THE SHADOW BROKER DLC WORTH BUYING

lustyloveylady:

gingerhaze:

HUNGER GAMES COMICS

PART 2

What the books are actually like

aph-ukraina:

A pysanka (Ukrainian: писанка, plural: pysanky) is a Ukrainian Easter egg, decorated with traditional Ukrainian folk designs using a wax-resist (batik) method. The word pysanka comes from the verb pysaty, “to write”, as the designs are not painted on, but written with beeswax.

Why the 50s were cool in the US:

fandomsandfeminism:

eternal-porcelain-empress:

  • economical growth
  • low taxes
  • a criminality rate of 4%
  • easy access to higher education
  • low unemployment rate
  • minimum wage could support a more than decent living
  • possibility of having your own house in the suburbs once you settled down
  • huge social mobility
  • falling debt level

image

Bonus : women were women

  • Horrific Racism
  • Horrific Queerphobia
  • Horrific Sexism
  • Horrific Ableism 
  • Horrific Anti-Semitism 
  • All of your points only apply to a select group of middle class white straight, cis men!
  • Your last point is blatantly awful 
  • Fuck the 50s. 

phrux:

dungeonsandpendragons:

Commonly confused medieval weapons, a powerpoint by me.

THIS is a WAR SCYTHE, a scythe actually used in combat. Notice it is not a useless piece of shit and is an actual functional weapon.

The only reason why death is pictured with a FARMING scythe is because he harvests souls.

A PATRON SAYS THEY’D LIKE TO “RENT” A BOOK

men are taught to apologize for their weaknesses,  women for their strengths.

iowawomensarchives:

"Today’s Girls Love Pink Bows as Playthings, but These Shoot" claims a recent New York Times article about archery’s current pop culture moment, thanks to the Hunger Games trilogy and Disney’s “Brave.” But as these 1940s images from the University of Iowa suggest, the latest resurgence is part of a longer tradition of female participation in the sport:

[Archery] had been a popular female sport for many centuries, with such famous archers as Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I. Women’s participation in archery did not breech any standards of propriety for young students. Archery was elegant and graceful, and women could participate outdoors, while corseted and dressed fashionably, and without having to wear the shocking bloomers… [Student experimentation] in competitive, individual sports such as fencing, archery, tennis, golf, and bicycling… were important for paving the way to more competitive and vigorous women’s sports. — Bright Epoch: Women and Coeducation in the American West by Andrea G. Radke-Moss

Iowa Digital Library: Archery series, University of Iowa Physical Education for Women digital collection

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the University of Iowa Department of Physical Education for Women Records, 1900-2006

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts